don Oscar Miro-Quesada

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don Oscar Miro-Quesada is a kamasqa curandero and altomisayoq adept from Peru and originator of the Pachakuti Mesa Tradition of cross-cultural shamanism. An OAS Fellow in Ethnopsychology, founder of The Heart of the Healer Alliance, and coauthor of Lessons in Courage (Rainbow Ridge, 2013, with Bonnie Glass-Coffin), he dedicates his life to the global revitalization of shamanic awareness as a means of restoring sacred trust between humankind and the natural world.

 

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The Pachakuti Mesa Tradition

don Oscar Miro-Quesada is a shamanic healer, teacher, and the originator of the Pachakuti Mesa tradition of cross-cultural shamanism. With Sounds True, don Oscar Miro-Quesada has created a new audio program called Healing Light: An Apprenticeship in Peruvian Shamanism. In this episode of Insights at the Edge, don Oscar and Tami Simon speak on the practice of Peruvian curanderismo in the modern world. They discuss the importance of creating a personalized altar space and how doing so creates the best possible environment for shamanic journeying. Finally, don Oscar and Tami talk about the relationship between shamanism and contemporary psychology, as well as what the Pachakuti Mesa tradition says about this critical moment in history. (80 minutes)

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Meet a Coauthor of . . . Freedom for All of Us

The Author

Matthieu Ricard is a Buddhist monk, humanitarian, and one of three authors of Freedom for All of Us: A Monk, a Philosopher, and a Psychiatrist on Finding Inner Peace, available in November, 2020. He is also the author of several other books, including The Monk and the Philosopher, Happiness, and Altruism. He is a major participant in research collaboration between cognitive scientists and Buddhist practitioners. Ricard is a noted translator and photographer, and has founded humanitarian projects in India, Tibet, and Nepal. For more information, visit karuna-shechen.org.

Freedom for All of Us Cover

The Book

With their acclaimed book In Search of Wisdom, three gifted friends—a monk, a philosopher, and a psychiatrist—shed light on our universal quest for meaning, purpose, and understanding. Now, in this new in-depth offering, they invite us to tend to the garden of our true nature: freedom.

Filled with unexpected insights and specific strategies, Freedom for All of Us presents an inspiring guide for breaking free of the unconscious walls that confine us.

 

Send us a photo of your sacred space.

[Pictured here is the] Shechen Monastery in Nepal, where I live a good part of the year:

 

Monastery

 

[And] the views from my hermitage in Nepal:

 

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If you could invite any three transformational leaders or spiritual teachers (throughout time) to dinner, who would they be and why?

I do not have dinner and he does not either, but if I had to choose to spend an hour quietly with someone alive today, it would be His Holiness the Dalai Lama. [He is] someone of boundless compassion and wisdom, who treats every sentient being—from the person who cleans the floor at the hotel when he travels, to a head of state—with the same kindness, respect, and attention.

As for [two people] who [are no longer] in this world, I would give everything to spend another hour in the presence of my two main spiritual teachers: Kangyur Rinpoche and Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche, who inspire every instant of my life.

Has your book taken on a new meaning in the world’s current circumstances? Is there anything you would have included in your book if you were writing it now?

Many people have indeed faced great hardship; being sick, left alone, and having lost a dear one. But for those who simply had to be with themselves and a few kin, I was quite surprised to see how difficult they found [it] to just be with their own minds for extended periods of time. It seemed that it was such a new situation and they had few tools to deal with it.

As a contemplative, I value tremendously [the] time spent alone in my hermitage in the Himalaya[s], cultivating fundamental human qualities that allow me to slowly become a better human being. I believe that among those qualities, inner freedom and compassion are two key factors and that, therefore, our dialogue [in Freedom for All of Us] is quite timely. Most of the subjects that we reflect upon seem very relevant [during] these troubled times and I hope that they will be useful!

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