The Power of Self-Hypnosis

January 19, 2010

Tami Simon speaks with Dr. Steven Gurgevich, a licensed psychologist who specializes in medical hypnosis. He is the director of the Mind-Body Clinic at Dr. Andrew Weil’s Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine and the author of several Sounds True titles including the Self-Hypnosis Home Study Course, Deep Sleep with Medical Self-Hypnosis and The Self Hypnosis Diet. He will also be teaching an online course beginning May 5, 2010 on The Power of Self-Hypnosis. Dr. Gurgevich discusses how self-hypnosis works and the role our subconscious mind plays in healing. (56 minutes)

Author Info for Dr. Steven Gurgevich Coming Soon

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Founded Sounds True in 1985 as a multimedia publishing house with a mission to disseminate spiritual wisdom. She hosts a popular weekly podcast called Insights at the Edge, where she has interviewed many of today's leading teachers. Tami lives with her wife, Julie M. Kramer, and their two spoodles, Rasberry and Bula, in Boulder, Colorado.

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The Power of Self-Hypnosis

Tami Simon speaks with Dr. Steven Gurgevich, a licensed psychologist who specializes in medical hypnosis. He is the director of the Mind-Body Clinic at Dr. Andrew Weil’s Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine and the author of several Sounds True titles including the Self-Hypnosis Home Study Course, Deep Sleep with Medical Self-Hypnosis and The Self Hypnosis Diet. He will also be teaching an online course beginning May 5, 2010 on The Power of Self-Hypnosis. Dr. Gurgevich discusses how self-hypnosis works and the role our subconscious mind plays in healing. (56 minutes)

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When people are down because they feel sad, lonely, meaningless, uncertain, or even just bored, they often turn to nostalgia. Nostalgia lifts our spirits and offers stability and guidance when life becomes chaotic and the future feels uncertain. Even though nostalgia contains sentiments of loss, it ultimately makes people feel happier, more authentic and self-confident, more loved and supported, and more likely to perceive life as meaningful. In addition, nostalgia inspires action. Nostalgia starts with people self-reflecting on cherished memories, but it also drives people to look outside of themselves, help others, create, and innovate.

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Get out a pen or pencil and a piece of paper; or use a digital device, such as a phone, tablet, or computer. Briefly jot down your reactions to the following questions: 

  • How would you define nostalgia?
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Excerpted from Past Forward: How Nostalgia Can Help You Live a More Meaningful Life by Clay Routledge, PhD.

Clay Routledge, PhD, is a leading expert in existential psychology. His work has been featured inn the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the Guardian, the Atlantic, The New Yorker, Wired, Forbes, and more. He is the vice president of research and director of the Human Flourishing Lab at the Archbridge Institute. For more, visit clayroutledge.com.

Past Forward

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