Danny Dreyer

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Danny Dreyer, a running coach and nationally ranked ultramarathoner, has more than 30 years of running experience. He is a student of renowned T’ai Chi master George Xu and has been published in Runner’s World and Running Times. He is the author (with Katherine Dreyer) of ChiRunning and ChiWalking.

Author photo © Lori Cheung

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Running and Walking as Spiritual Practice

Tami Simon speaks with Danny Dreyer, a marathon runner, esteemed running coach, and a student of t’ai chi master George Xu. He’s the author of two books; ChiRunning and ChiWalking, as well as the Sounds True audio programs of the same name. Danny discusses finding stillness in the midst of action and the importance of incorporating chi into all aspects of our lives, what Danny calls “creating the conditions for energy to flow.” Danny also offers a practice intended to help us move and live from our center. (51 minutes)

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