Alex Theory

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Dr. Alex Theory is a CEO, Executive Producer, media pioneer, and wellness expert. He specializes in the psychological and physiological impact of music/visuals upon the human nervous system. During his career Dr. Theory has produced numerous large scale events, interactive experieces, television shows, and music albums. He has worked with clients such as Cirque du Soleil, Google, iTunes, MGM, ABC Television, Lucas Arts, PBS, Sting, Black Eyed Peas, Elton John, Alanis Morissette, and many others. In addition to producing media & events, he enjoys conducting research, writing music, and lecturing at conferences/festivals around the world. Currently, Dr. Theory is a Governor on the board of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (Grammys®). www.drtheory.com

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Full Spectrum Sound Healing

Tami Simon speaks with Alex Theory a talented musician who draws upon his training in shamanic practice, psychology, and music production in order to develop new techniques and approaches in music and sound therapy. Through Sounds True, Alex has released a series called Full Spectrum Sound Healing; a four-CD exploration of the healing frequencies and sonic characteristics of the elements light, earth, air, and water. Alex discusses the role of sound technology in the 21st century, the work of Alfred Tomatis, and the sound frequency of the earth itself (what’s called the Schumann Resonance). (67 minutes)

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